2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Total:  25.8 million people, or 8.3% of the population, have diabetes.

Diagnosed: 18.8 million people

Undiagnosed:7.0 million people

 

Diagnosed and Undiagnosed Diabetes Among People Aged 20 years or older, United States, 2010

Age 20 years or older: 25.6 million, or 11.3% of all people in this age group, have diabetes.

Age 65 years or older: 10.9 million, or 26.9% of all people in this age group, have diabetes.

Men: 13.0 million, or 11.8% of all men aged 20 years or older, have diabetes.

Women: 12.6 million, or 10.8% of all women aged 20 years or older, have diabetes.

Non-Hispanic whites: 15.7 million, or 10.2% of all non-Hispanic whites aged 20 years or older, have diabetes.

Non-Hispanic blacks: 4.9 million, or 18.7% of all non-Hispanic blacks aged 20 years or older, have diabetes.

Diagnosed Diabetes Among People Younger Than 20 Years of Age, United States, 2010

  • About 215,000 people younger than 20 years have diabetes (type 1 or type 2). This represents 0.26% of all people in this age group. Estimates of undiagnosed diabetes are unavailable for this age group.
  • About one in 400 children and adolescents has diabetes.

Diagnosed Diabetes Racial and Ethnic Differences

  • Hispanic/Latino Americans are 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes than non-Hispanic whites.
  • African Americans are 1.8 times more likely to have diabetes than non-Hispanic whites

Prediabetes

  • There are 79 million Americans aged 20 years or older with prediabetes.

Gestational Diabetes in the United States

  • Prior studies have shown women who have had gestational diabetes are at risk (of up to 60%) for developing diabetes in the next 10 to 20 years. New diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes will increase the proportion of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Using these new diagnostic criteria, an international, multicenter study of gestational diabetes found that 18% of the pregnancies were affected by gestational diabetes.

Deaths Among People With Diabetes, United States, 2007

  • Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death based on U.S. death certificates in 2007. This ranking is based on the 71,382 death certificates in 2007 in which diabetes was the underlying cause of death. Diabetes was a contributing cause of death in an additional 160,022 death certificates for a total of 231,404 certificates in 2007 in which diabetes appeared as any-listed cause of death.  

Complications of Diabetes in the United States

Heart disease and stroke

  • In 2004, heart disease was noted on 68% of diabetes-related death certificates among people aged 65 years or older.
  • In 2004, stroke was noted on 16% of diabetes-related death certificates among people aged 65 years or older.

Hypertension

  • In 2005–2008, of adults aged 20 years or older with self-reported diabetes, 67% had blood pressure greater than or equal to 140/90 mmHg or used prescription medications for hypertension.

Blindness and eye problems

  • Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74 years.
  • In 2005–2008, 4.2 million (28.5%) people with diabetes aged 40 years or older had diabetic retinopathy, and of these, almost 0.7 million (4.4% of those with diabetes) had advanced diabetic retinopathy that could lead to severe vision loss.

Kidney disease

  • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, accounting for 44% of all new cases of kidney failure in 2008.
  • In 2008, a total of 202,290 people with end-stage kidney disease due to diabetes were living on chronic dialysis or with a kidney transplant in the United States.

Nervous system disease

  • About 60% to 70% of people with diabetes have mild to severe forms of nervous system damage. The results of such damage include impaired sensation or pain in the feet or hands, slowed digestion of food in the stomach, carpal tunnel syndrome, erectile dysfunction, or other nerve problems.

Dental disease

  • Adults aged 45 years or older with poorly controlled diabetes (A1c > 9%) were 2.9 times more likely to have severe periodontitis than those without diabetes. The likelihood was even greater (4.6 times) among smokers with poorly controlled diabetes.

Download the PDF version of the National Diabetes Fact Sheet (2.5 MB PDF)